SCHOLARS OF ASTRONOMY IN ISLAMIC CIVILIZATION AND THEIR CONTRIBUTION TO WORLD HISTORY OF SCIENCE -International Panel-

SCHOLARS OF ASTRONOMY IN ISLAMIC CIVILIZATION AND THEIR CONTRIBUTION TO WORLD HISTORY OF SCIENCE -International Panel-

An international panel titled “Scholars of Astronomy in Islamic Civilization and their Contribution to World History of Science” is organized jointly by OIC Research Centre for Islamic History, Art and Culture (IRCICA) and the Metropolitan Municipality of İstanbul, Directorate of Culture.

The Panel will be inaugurated in the conference hall of the Çit Qasr on the premises of IRCICA on 7 May 2010 at 10.00 a.m., with the addresses given by Prof. Dr. Ekmeleddin İhsanoğlu, Secretary General of the Organization of the Islamic Conference and Founder Chairman of Turkish History of Science Association (TBTK), Dr. Kadir Topbaş, Mayor of the Metropolitan Municipality of İstanbul, and Dr. Halit Eren, Director General of IRCICA.

Astronomy has an important place in Islamic history of science. During the Abbasid period, the science of astronomy, which was transmitted from earlier and contemporaneous civilizations in the 8th century, was developed with the original contributions of scholars in the Muslim countries. In the technical sense, the first observatory was built in the 9th century in the Muslim world and in the following centuries various Muslim states supported astronomical studies and numerous scholars were trained in this field. The Turks have a major share in the progress made by astronomy. The science of astronomy reached its zenith in the Middle Ages during the period of ruler and scholar Uluğ Bey, at which time scholars of astronomy traveled back and forth between Samarkand and the capital of the Ottomans. Consequently the science of astronomy that developed within the Islamic civilization was transmitted to Europe thus contributing to the Renaissance.

Various activities are undertaken all over the world and in our country, specifically by the universities and scientific associations, on the occasion of United Nation’s announcement of the year 2009 as the “International Year of Astronomy” which coincides with the 400th anniversary of Galileo’s first observation of the sky with a telescope. Within this framework, the Panel will discuss the Muslim scientists’ contribution to the development of European science of astronomy.

Historians of science from various countries will participate in this panel that will be held on 7-8 May 2010.